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Cloudscapes

 

Cloudscapes

In August/September 2012 I worked for six weeks as an artist-in-residence on Halsnøy Island on the westcoast of Norway. During this time I often walked along the coast around the island. Soon I realized that I can’t exclude the surrounding scenery from my work. But the landscape of the island itself did not inspire me as much as the unaccessible, unreachable sky above the opposite coast. So my main concern interest was with observing the heavens: The formations of clouds are always unique objects. They appear and dissapear – they change permanently. No moment, no formation will ever come back. Only with photography has it been possible to capture the different formations of clouds and to classify them. The photographic process enables comparative observation and the freezing of an elusive natural phenomena. One can say that we are able to look now at the sky with a photographic eye. After some days, I took my large-format camera with an wide angel lens along with me on my walks. In order to reserve the few 4x5inch negative films I had taken with me to Norway, I began to load the plate holders with normal b/w photopaper. After each trip along the coast, I immediately developed the paper in an improvised darkroom in the basement of the house where I lived. I realized that these negative images present the skyscapes captured by my camera and by the chemicals on the photopaper rather than that seen with my own eyes. They show this photographic view I mentioned before. Therefore it was obvious to me to turn the images upside down the same way they are projected through the camera.

 

silvergelantine prints
presented in filmholders
unique edition
2012